Cultism misleading believers

Non-church goers usually have one reason in common as to the reason they do not attend church.

And that is the undue influence that church pastors tend to have on their congregants.

Ironically, this mishap is fast gaining precedence in Africa.

Charismatic leaders with a claim on spiritual knowledge and matters requiring adherence to certain lifestyles and practices have swayed many a devout and overzealous followers into cultism.

A cult is simply a religious group, often living together, whose beliefs are considered extreme or strange by many people.

A more recent example is the ongoing and illuminating discovery of a religious cult by the Kenyan Good News International Church, Pastor Mackenzie who told his gullible followers that the world would end in June 2023.

A sad tale of events followed soon after as he is alleged to have encouraged them to starve to death.

Resultantly, at the end of last week, the Kenya Red Cross reported that 410 people, including 227 children, who were thought to have some connection to Pastor Mackenzie’s church, were missing.

More hideous and horrific tales are being told of congregants being forced to starve as part of their adherence to its teachings.

Titus Katana, who managed to escape, says those who tried to leave the cult were branded as traitors and faced violent attacks.

There has been talk of the rise of such cult-like religious entities in Zimbabwe, blamed for misleading ardent followers recently.

The Independent End Time Message Church has been identified by some commentators as a cult.

The church was founded by Robert Martin Gumbura, who was convicted in 2014 on multiple counts of rape and sentenced to 40 years in prison.

Growing up, it was common knowledge that there was a certain church nicknamed ‘wapusa wapusa’ which prophesied the end of the world in the new millennium or year 2 000.

Some schools of thought have even accused Johanne Marange’s church’s occultic given the way members resist certain beneficial aspects available to them such as good health practices of vaccinating against viruses and plagues that usually ravage the country.

Moreover, the church’s violation of children’s rights through promotion of child marriages has led many to castigate it for its exclusionist tendencies.

This sheds light on why cult religions are generally frowned upon.

For starters, they tend to deceive and destroy human lives in the name of God.

They preach a false gospel and lead people into a false spirituality

This is evident in that a cult religion has many devout followers who dot take lightly to criticism of their leader.

Certain churches come to mind of congregants who put their leaders above all else and extol them for possessing supernatural powers such as giving life or even manifesting non-existent things into being such as owning a car by merely wishing upon it.

Such faith, although encouraged in the Bible becomes problematic if it is attributed to a human being other than God.

It traps the believer in that their genuineness is misplaced.

Therefore victims are kept blinded from the true gospel of Christ and held in bondage to a false belief system.

One might as well ask, if there is any solution to the problem of cults seeing their proliferation in the country and beyond.

Although difficult to pinpoint, there remains one practical solution which is to live by the word.

Christianity recognises the word as the only and absolute truth from God and if one replaces it with other substituted truth that becomes idolatry which leads to cultism.

 

Cultism misleading Zimbabwe

Non church goers usually have one reason in common as to the reason they do not attend church.

And that is the undue influence that church pastors tend to have on their congregants.

Ironically, this mishap is fast gaining precedence in Africa.

Charismatic leaders with a claim on spiritual knowledge and matters requiring adherence to certain lifestyles and practices have swayed many a devout and overzealous followers into cultism.

A cult is simply a religious group, often living together, whose beliefs are considered extreme or strange by many people.

A more recent example is the ongoing and illuminating discovery of a religious cult by the Kenyan Good News International Church, Pastor Mackenzie who told his gullible followers that the world would end in June 2023.

A sad tale of events followed soon after as he is alleged to have encouraged them to starve to death.

Resultantly, at the end of last week, the Kenya Red Cross reported that 410 people, including 227 children, who were thought to have some connection to Pastor Mackenzie’s church, were missing.

More hideous and horrific tales are being told of congregants being forced to starve as part of their adherence to its teachings.

Titus Katana, who managed to escape, says those who tried to leave the cult were branded as traitors and faced violent attacks.

There has been talk of the rise of such cult-like religious entities in Zimbabwe, blamed for misleading ardent followers recently.

The Independent End Time Message Church has been identified by some commentators as a cult.

The church was founded by Robert Martin Gumbura, who was convicted in 2014 on multiple counts of rape and sentenced to 40 years in prison.

Growing up, it was common knowledge that there was a certain church nicknamed ‘wapusa wapusa’ which prophesied the end of the world in the new millennium or year 2 000.

Some schools of thought have even accused Johanne Marange’s church’s occultic given the way members resist certain beneficial aspects available to them such as good health practices of vaccinating against viruses and plagues that usually ravage the country.

Moreover, the church’s violation of children’s rights through promotion of child marriages has led many to castigate it for its exclusionist tendencies.

This sheds light on why cult religions are generally frowned upon.

For starters, they tend to deceive and destroy human lives in the name of God.

They preach a false gospel and lead people into a false spirituality

This is evident in that a cult religion has many devout followers who dot take lightly to criticism of their leader.

Certain churches come to mind of congregants who put their leaders above all else and extol them for possessing supernatural powers such as giving life or even manifesting non-existent things into being such as owning a car by merely wishing upon it.

Such faith, although encouraged in the Bible becomes problematic if it is attributed to a human being other than God.

It traps the believer in that their genuineness is misplaced.

Therefore victims are kept blinded from the true gospel of Christ and held in bondage to a false belief system.

One might as well ask, if there is any solution to the problem of cults seeing their proliferation in the country and beyond.

Although difficult to pinpoint, there remains one practical solution which is to live by the word.

Christianity recognises the word as the only and absolute truth from God and if one replaces it with other substituted truth that becomes idolatry which leads to cultism.

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